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Mt. Olivet Baptist Church ~ Refreshment Stop ~ Adams St.

Mt. Olivet Baptist Church
Mt. Olivet Baptist Church was organized in 1910, and the congregation built its first building on this site between 1912 and 1915. That building was replaced by a second church, begun in 1923 and dedicated in 1927. Today the 1927 sanctuary remains part of the church complex, but a state-of-the-art sanctuary dedicated in 1999 is the main worship space for this thriving congregation.

Church description from www.landmarksociety.org

Stevens/Walls House/Singer Home ~ Clarissa St. ~ 1900

Singer Home - Clarissa Street - 1900
Former residents of this house highlight its significance. When Clarissa Street was known as Caledonia Avenue, the Stevens family called this house their home. Jessie Stevens operated a grocery store down the street on the corner of Spring Street. Daughter Jennie’s son, Charles Price, became the first African American officer on the Rochester police force. Daughter Bessie Walls became a teacher and, for quite some time, was the only African American teacher in the Rochester City School District.

Bessie and her husband lived here until the early 1960s when they sold the homestead to Aunt Pearl James. Aunt Pearl served for many years at Strong Memorial Hospital, as well as the Elks Club.

The current owners bought the home in 1984. After their three children grew up and moved out on their own, they opened up the house as a Bed and Breakfast. They also operate their herbal tea business, Hallelujah Royal Heritage Tea, from the house.

Hawley House/Copeland Home ~ Eagle St. ~ c.1880

Copeland Home - Eagle Street - circa 1880
This lovely Queen Anne Victorian appears to have been built in approximately 1880. The land itself, originally owned by Judge Chapin, was sold to Nelson G. Hawley, a State Street bookbinder, for $423.63. Mr. Hawley had planned to build a row house and live in one side of the structure but, unfortunately, he did not survive to see the house finished. It was eventually occupied by the McKelvey family. The two halves were originally mirror images and the two front parlors were joined by double arched brick passageways. Currently, the two dwellings are quite different, with #21 (on the holiday tour last year) retaining much of the original Victorian spirit and #23 updated to a modern, open structure. The current homeowner lived in New York City for many years, moving to Rochester 11 years ago. Many Corn Hill homes, and his home in particular, reminded him of the brownstones on the upper east side of Manhattan. He bought his current home in May 2005 and Corn Hill has become “home” to this New York City transplant. He loves the neighborhood and has made many friends in this close knit community. He values how the neighbors look out for one another.

Miller House/McGhee Home ~ Atkinson St. ~ 1895

McGhee Home - Atkinson St. 1895
When Corn Hill Landing was built, the goal was to recapture the charm of the European village and update it with the finest comforts of modern luxury. A magnificent view of the Rochester city skyline is just the first highlight you’ll notice. The location features boutique shops and services, as well as unique dining opportunities. Amenities include private underground parking, modern effective security, a fitness center, a harbormaster and access to boat docks.

This spectacular home, built in 1895, has almost no history in the usual sense – it has never been rebuilt in any way, it has not been bought and sold a number of times, and it has not been touched by the usual flow of fashion in interior design. Because of this, it is judged as a truly authentic example of Queen Anne design of late 19th-century America.

The current owner and his late wife bought the house 25 years ago, after learning, “It hadn’t been all chopped up and rooms moved around.” Prior owner Cora Russell was only the second owner of the house (her father, Anthony Miller, was the first), and she kept it the same way until she died at 94. The current owner bought the estate from her niece.

Conklin Home ~ Exchange Blvd. – Corn Hill Landing ~ 2005

2009 Conklin - Exchange Blvd. 2005
When Corn Hill Landing was built, the goal was to recapture the charm of the European village and update it with the finest comforts of modern luxury. A magnificent view of the Rochester city skyline is just the first highlight you’ll notice. The location features boutique shops and services, as well as unique dining opportunities. Amenities include private underground parking, modern effective security, a fitness center, a harbormaster and access to boat docks.

This year’s tour features an apartment with a beautiful view of the Genesee River. The homeowner downsized in 2005 from a ten-room, 100-year-old home in Maplewood, where she had lived for more than forty years. Her new home is a 1600 square foot, two-story loft apartment. That’s significant downsizing!

Ianazzi Home ~ Adams St. ~ c.1880s

2009 Adams Street, circa 1880
This small brick cottage stands today as the result of a change in community development policy from that of demolition to conservation. It originally served the servants of some of Corn Hill’s wealthiest families. It was bought by a previous owner for $800 at a city auction in 1977 to save it from the wrecking ball. He filled three dumpsters with the debris he and friends hauled out of the house.

The present owners have owned the home since 1999. The backyard was completely re-landscaped in 2006 to create an easy-to-maintain urban space. The new design mantra for the house is “ease of living.” The owners want to create an easy to maintain, work-free environment.

An exterior renovation, complete with a new front landscape, picket fence and new paint color is set for spring 2010.

Shaw House/Sarkis Home ~ Atkinson St. ~ 1837

2009 Atkinson Street, 1837
The Henry Shaw House was built by a wealthy fur trader in 1837. Some of the many changes included addition of a carriage house, an in-ground pool, and a process of restoration that began in 1991.

The present owner originally owned the home from 1991-1997 and repurchased it in early 2009, creating a beautiful home for himself and his father, who is now retired. It has become “the family home” and the extended family gathers here nearly every Sunday for dinner.

The neighborhood has immensely enjoyed watching this grand home regain its original glory.

End Time Deliverance Miracle Ministry ~ Gathering Place

End Time Deliverance Miracle Ministry - Corn Hill
The red Medina sandstone outer walls of this church are what remains of the Richardsonian Romanesque-style exterior of Corn Hill Methodist Episcopal Church, built in 1900. Due to declining membership, the United Methodist denomination donated the building to the African Methodist Episcopal denomination in 1969. Several suspicious fires damaged the building in 1970-71. After the last and most disastrous fire in August 1971, the handful of members left in the congregation banded together to build a new sanctuary within the surviving sandstone walls. The building now houses the End Time Deliverance Miracle Ministry.